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that is so dishonorable as to leave this great nation. i'm leaving immediately for new york. come with me or not. >> so loyalty -- did he say damn the torpedoes? >> did he say damn the -- well, i'm looking -- [laughter] my wife has heard me say this before. the words that i used in the book seem to to me to be the liy ones, that he was actually speaking to the captain of the ship right alongside four bells, captain -- [inaudible] full speed ahead and so on. so it wasn't quite what has come down in history, but the sense of it was pretty much that. and, of course, the question i always and -- ask my students is if he might have said, damn, the torpedoes! [laughter] we may never know. >> as i quote in the book, there was a marine standing near farragut on the hartford when the tecumseh went down and the brooklyn, which was just ahead of the hartford in the line of ships, stopped at the line of torpedoes, and the whole fleet came to a stop at fort morgan who were punishing them. and that's when farragut orderlied the hartford to go ahead of the brooklyn, and the rest of the ships followed, a
to help the citizens of new york, new jersey, and other parts of the northeast as they recover from the damn of hurricane van dihurricane sandy. as we did before, we have an opportunity to help maim make families and communities whole again. i hope my colleagues will join in moving quickly to send aid to those affected by sandy as they continue to recover and rebuild. the senate must move swiftly to approve supplemental disaster aid and act to give the intelligence community the stools tools it needs to -- the tools it needs to keep our nation safe before the christmas holiday. before we leave for chris marks we'll have to finish our work on sandy and fisa. they're both extremely important, but they have to be completed. so everyone should understand we have that to do, and it appears at this stage we'll see if anything changes -- but it appears that we're going to be coming back the day after christmas to complete work on the fiscal cliff and a few other leftover items. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, i want to start by extending my deepest sympathies to the families of the victims o
and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of the envelope, it's about time you got your book out 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would but again piecing things together, "u.s. news and world report"'s, "life" magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story and the story again again of a protago
that? "the new york times" recently wrote that in florida, quote, as he ballot scandal seemed to arrive like clockwork. end of quote. i am pleased that two secretaries of state are with us today. i welcome i was secretary of state, matt schulz, state election officials are well-versed on the procedures that are needed to run their elections. conscientious state officials such as my secretary of state have sought to remove noncitizens from the voter rolls. federal officials did not assist them in ensuring that legal holes are not honored by the counting of votes from ineligible voters. in fact, the department fact the department of homeland security did all he could to prevent maintaining integrity of voting roll. we will hear that turnout rises when ballot integrity is fostered. states have a fair amount of discretion in how they choose to run elections. early voting has grown in popularity. but there's a cost even beyond the lack of a common civic engagement on election day. and i look forward to this hearing, and hope that we get an answer to these questions. but circumstances could c
confederate flags. "the new york times" reported in that meeting that a considerable section in the seats was devoted to denouncing the 1964 civil rights act. and any review that says that the only key issues in thurmond's career for constitutionalism and national security, i don't think can be taken, i don't think that passes the laugh test. of what we all know about strom thurmond and his career. so i was disappointed that "the wall street journal" felt that this man, let a close relationship with thurmond had been employed by thurmond, he admits that in the review, but then talks about that he was the best person to evaluate the book for the readers. i thought that was disappointing. >> he had no knowledge of what was being done at the time, that edwards, that was going to be, they didn't tell you ahead of time? >> no. >> that he was going to be the person? >> no. >> you have any other papers like the new times or anything -- >> there were no other reviews to the "washington post," washington monthly, if you google "strom thurmond's america" you will find some. and you should google it
from new york. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be repealed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: thank you, mr. president. first i want to thank my great colleague from pennsylvania, i enjoyed sharing a table last night with him and his beautiful, charming, intelligent wife, who he's lucky he would be the first to admit he's lucky to have married, and their four great girls. but second, thank him for his excellent, as usual, on-target remarks. we have a great chairman of the j.e.c. and every time he comes to the floor, it shows shoas. olympia snowe, bill kristol, congressman mike simpson of idaho, david brooks, congresswoman bono-mack and walter jones, "the national review." we're here to ai seau passing the senate's middle-class tax cut is the right thing to do. you don't have to take our word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear
in 1863 when he brought hartford back from recess to new york and there was a big political rally going on. they were on the stage, and lincoln was concerned particularly from george mcclellan in the 1864 campaign he was uncertain about how these other generals and add morals might react, and he was there but sort of pushed up on to the stage and he said i have no speech to get i will do my job in the water and you will do your job here. i have no political interest and he left the stage. that characteristic was valuable to lincoln as well. >> back to loyalty. >> he was the grant of the needy. >> i ask if anyone would ascribe that. what astounds me because i am afraid of ships and said he was in his thirties. this guy was in his 60s. that's a tough service and demanding coming yet he managed to be heroic and it gives us all hope. [laughter] would highlight the most i'm going to ask a few more questions but i also going to ask if you have questions this would be a good time for you to line up liking on either side of the ottilie and i see a few of that will turn to you, but while you are wa
% of the people and say to the president that's it, no more, come back on the debt ceiling. the "new york times" wrote about that as a fallback position. could you support that? >> well, first of all, i don't want to feed into the doomsday stuff. i'm confident there are enough people, the majority of people in the town that understand what we are playing with here, playing chicken with is the most important country in the world, and, you know, with are on the verge of doing significant, and, perhaps, lasting damage to the enormous and extraordinary country we inherited. nobody wants that to be a part of the public service legacy. that being said, before we talk about fiscal cliffs, remember, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff type scenario with the debt limit that credited the scenario that led to this, and this idea i voted against that, put bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. well, surprise, it didn't work. here we are, again, facing this. we have two issues to face. number one is in the immediate te
up in new york, and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife back into my first year legal research because i had to certify, authorize this was a piece of nonfiction, and you have to put down. i felt with a memoir you could just wig it. well, you can't because once you start highlighting things, you have to get authority for it. you even have to get a concept from people who you put photographs in, the consent of the army, consent of all -- i had a letter from james meredith right after i left which is in the book it, and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, well, you need his permission. i didn't need his permission, he sent it to me. but he didn't send it to the world. he signed it, on the back side of the envelope he said t about time you got your book out, 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would. but, again, piecing things together, "u.s. news & world report," saturday evening, life magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story, and with the
. no early voting in new jersey and new york, the states hardest hit so you had the week before, in other states you might have -- in north carolina significant number of the electorate already voted. so in both states ex-if if you cast a provisional ballot, it doesn't count at all. fortunately the state at the last minute had executive orders that opened that up. but how much education they were able get to out when people were just trying to unbury their lives and didn't have electricity and power. so allowing people who cast provisional ballots would have provided more flexibility, understanding ahead of time so people knew they could have gone to another precinct and voted and haste count. we want people to have their ballots counted but it wasn't able to get back to that location, so look at ways to expand the ability of people to vote and other options. expanding the way you vote permanently and looking how you inform people about the polling locations and ways -- text-messaging, or other -- that clearly broke down. >> for me, the problem with the electoral college. my job is to get
and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your public career? >> well, there are certain things that haunt me even to this day. and that is the realization of that the war can change a person's character and personality. one might be content and say i'm a good person. now, for example one week before i got into the service and put on my uniform i was and sunday school teacher and i sang in acquire. my mother was a devout methodist , christian temperance movement. they don't get any more difficult than that. the whole family was that way. then after training and going overseas, i recalled telling the first german -- killing the first german. the thing that haunts me is
for us. in the spring we experienced late freezes in michigan and new york and pennsylvania that wiped out fruit crops. a lot of small family farms, farms in northern michigan wiped out. in my home state late freezes in the spring caused cherry producers to lose practically their entire crop right off the bat. it warmed up, the buds came out, then they had a deep freeze; killed everything. our growers produce 75% of the u.s. supply of cherries. that's around 270 million pounds. and the cherry producers experienced 98% loss. now in our amendment, in the disaster bill and in the farm bill, we give them some help because they spent the rest of the crop year this year having to pay to maintain the orchards and the frees, eating the costs and hoping the trees will bounce back next year and produce a crop. so they have all the costs of maintaining everything but no revenue coming in. cherry producers were also forced to fight spreading diseases like cherry leaf spot and bacterial tinker, making the trees even more costly to maintain and at risk of loss. they didn't just lose their crop this
, is not on the news every night and cnn is not broadcasting from the shores of new york and new jersey -- that happened for a few days and then we've gone on to other pressing issues of the day. and as new challenges arise, the press attention will be diverted, as is natural. the problem is it may be natural but it's not necessarily good for people that have lost their homes, lost their businesses and without quick action from congress and robust, definitive, comprehensive support from the federal government, these individuals, these communities will not be able to recover. and i am living testimony as a senator from one of the state's hardest hit in recent memory from a natural disaster to really to be able to testify as almost an eyewitness -- as an eyewitness of what happened in the aftermath of hurricanes katrina and what is possible in this recovery for hurricane sandy. it's been over seven weeks since hurricane sandy claimed the lives of more than 130 americans, destroying -- and i want to correct the record -- 340,000 homes and 200,000 businesses. just to put that in comparison,
to helping new jersey and certainly new york as well and the region, recovered. because you know, when we had hurricane katrina in the gulf coast in mississippi and alabama and louisiana, i was there. when we had tornadoes in joplin missouri, i was there. when we had flooding along the mississippi, i was there. when we had crop destruction in the midwest, i have been there because i believe this is the united states of america. and so i fully expect that now that for the first time we have a type of devastation that other should understand and we are going to have to type a response that others have to see. so i would like to get a sense of view as the type of commitment this administration has. >> senator, thank you for the eloquent remarks about this. as you know, this is a region i too have roots in. to use your term, i married up, i married a jersey girl and work in new jersey and new york and besides the personal commitment i feel, i have also seen a president who was on the ground, in new jersey and almost immediately has done everything he can to help in the short term and has given me
about middle class americans extended the tax cuts so they don't get hurt. "the new york times" editorial today on how the gop proposal says raising the medicare eligibility hurts working-class americans unable to work to 67. it's likely to increase health care costs. >> guest: with all respect in "the new york times" they are somewhat critical of republicans. they don't see the world the way that we do and that's fair enough. but having said that, look this is a good-faith effort, and the 67 figured that's something the president raised before and talked about in terms of his sight. so let's recognize the demographic reality. we have a lot longer than we used to live. >> host: you're talking abut raising the eligibility age from 65 to 67. that is an idea. >> guest: i probably would. it's in the context with what else we have out there. we've done that with social security. we give people a lot of time it's not like we do it tomorrow with anybody close. but again, we change the social security system it's not a surprise to me i want to get a check at 65 the way my dad did but i
jersey or new york, they get to decide. not the appropriators, not the authorizing committee, the cor corps's going to decide. well, i can tell you one organization that has a problem with priorities in this country today is the corps of engineers. and to blanket whatever they say as a priority versus having government oversight and committee oversight and appropriator oversight, by giving this blanket waiver, what we do is we take away our powers to correct them. and all this does is say that it's not automatically authorized and we will have plenty of time. because all these are mitigation projects. they all ought to be authorized and approved by the committee of jurisdiction as they go forward. all they have to do is come to congress and say, give us approval on this. rather than a blanket approval. and i think we're setting a terrible precedent, because what it says is, in the future, then we're going to let the corps decides what is important rather than the -- corps decide what is important rather than the governors, rather than the state legislature or rather than the congress.
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16